Kitchen Updates (in which we add another good dose of IKEA to our home and are thrilled about it)

Take a good, hard look at this picture and let’s play the game “spot the differences.”

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(Hard-core yearning after some Highlights magazine puzzles right about now)…

Compare the picture above to the picture below. See? SEE?

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**That board above the left upper cabinet MAY be a hint to the project we want to tackle next…any guesses?

We made two changes after our IKEA shopping trip: first, we swapped out the yellowed light fixture for a simple white ALANG light fixture. Ken’s a pro at this now; this is the third one he’s installed on our main floor. Overkill? Quite possibly, but hey, the price/simplicity was RIGHT.

The other thing we switched out was the kitchen hardware. Before, we had some oil-rubbed bronze pulls. We replaced the ones on the cabinet doors with IKEA’s FÅGLAVIK handles ($8 per pair), which was relatively easy–all I had to do was unscrew the knob, drill an additional hole (drilling a pilot hole first!), and attach the new handles.

Sidenote 1: this is quite possibly the most nerve-wracking diy project I’ve tackled in this new house–everything else has been more or less salvageable, but DRILLING HOLES IN PERFECTLY GOOD CABINETS? Crazytown. Not to mention that our cabinets are not painted white–they have a plasticky coating that would be impossible/veryverydifficult to patch. But I survived.

Sidenote 2: this is now the second kitchen I’ve added hardware to: the first was this $2 upgrade I made to our apartment kitchen. You’ll be happy to hear we received our entire deposit back in full despite this unsanctioned upgrade… :)

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The (MUCH) more complicated change we made was on the drawers, where we installed IKEA’s FÅGLEBODA cup pulls (also $8/pair). We chose these because the traditional open handle would not cover the hole left from the original knob. These cover that nicely.

But installing them was A PROCESS. I not only had to measure out and drill 2 holes instead of one (drilling a pilot hole first), but the screws provided with the pulls were MUCH too short. Rather than go the easy route and purchase longer screws, I elected to enlarge the drilled hole from the backside of the cabinet face so that the screw was actually inset in the drawers.

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The light fixture was $30 and the hardware was $104, so this was a pretty affordable change that we’ll be able to enjoy for a while. I think Kenny and I both came to the conclusions that 1) we’d be fine (thrilled, really) living in this house for the rest of our lives, and 2) we’d eventually like to give this kitchen a major overhaul in a few years. The cabinets are original (we think) and are in pretty great shape for being 20 years old, but there are some layout and design things we’d like to switch up. But in the meantime, I’m more than satisfied with the simple changes we’re making in this space.

Please validate me by leaving a comment.