The Greatest Garden Bed Covers Ever. Featuring: Feathers.

Since it’s been a month since my last post, I figured it was time to clue you in to a pretty sweet project my grandpa and I did.

Last year, bunnies and deer ate most of our garden and it was very sad. So this year, when we were garden planning and I saw Laura’s post on how they covered their raised beds, I hatched a plan.

I enlisted my very handy grandpa to help, and he built these frames for me during the week while I was stuck in my little cubicle working. Retirement…sheesh.

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From there, I took over. My parents have a farm (READ THE FARM BLOG HERE OKAY) and an old, industrial sized chicken coop that they are dismantling, so they had a LOT of wire cages that were coming out to be recycled. So I helped out a little on the recycling front.

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I carefully snipped out triangles of the cage sheets to fit the frames grandpa had built, and then I painstakingly stapled the cages to the frames by hand. Grandpa, meanwhile, sized large rectangles of cages to go along the long sides of the covers.

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Next was installation day. Kenny helped a little with this, but we both work better when we’re not working together (#truth) so I took over. We screwed 3 triangle frames to each bed.

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Grandpa designed these so that a 2×4 would be able to drop into the top of the triangle frames to support the side panels.

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I had to assemble the side panels, and I hand-stapled the cage panels grandpa had prepared to the corners of a few 2x4s.

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Like so. Oh, the cage panels the grandpa cut were ingeniously hinged in the middle. Partially because due to the original chicken cage construction–no panels quiiiite wide enough–and partially for ease of access to veggies. I’ll explain more in a bit.

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Kenny did help me haul these humongous and awkward side panels and set them into place on the triangle frames. I added a few more screws to keep everything nice and sturdy.

Those are feathers on the ground, left over from the cages. Such is life when you recycle.

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I have the option of opening up half of the cage (as pictured below, fancy!) OR I could pull up the whole panel if I needed. I have never needed to do that so far.

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We made 6 covers and installed 4. Our garden has expanded to 6 boxes, but the fifth one is a rhubarb bed (I’M AN ADULT) which the rabbits and deer do not eat and the sixth one we have yet to fill with soil.

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See?  Rhubarb.

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We’ll probably remove these each winter to prolong the life of the covers. Aren’t they swell? I have such a handy family. And the best part of these is that the only thing we had to purchase were 6 10′ 2×4 boards for the top of the frame, so this was a very very cheap project. My fave.

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